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FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN  / Holiday Treats /   Editorial List

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Holiday Treats
 

 

Believe it or not, just after the blessed end of this yearís election season, holiday season arrives. Because holiday season preparations can be somewhat more complicated once we become caregivers, for the next few weeks, we will be presenting you with some helpful hints to ensure a joyous Christmas, Hanukah or Kwanzaa for you and your loved ones.
 
Here are a few things to remember as you plan for your holidays:
 
1) Maintain a sense of familiarity for your loved ones. Go easy on the decorations, and donít move too much furniture to accommodate trees or other objects. Changing familiar surroundings can lead to confusion, especially for someone with memory problems or poor vision.  Extra cords, fragile decorations, and piles of gifts can be hazards to those with limited mobility.
 
2) With the entire holiday hubbub, your loved one could become confused and agitated. Try to limit the number of guests in your home at one time, and make sure that someone is always aware of the whereabouts of your loved one. If he or she tends to wander, there is a chance that this may happen when everyone thinks someone else is ďon watch.Ē
 
3) Ask for help! Donít try to take on all of the burdens of caring for your loved one and preparing for the holidays. Something as simple as asking a neighbor or other relative to stay with your loved one for a few hours while you get some shopping done can make all the difference between a calm and a stressed-out holiday.
 
4) Above all, (this is my personal favorite) take time for yourself. Spend an hour in a bubble bath, read a book, or do something else that you enjoy, and have fun. The holidays are about fun and enjoyment, so make sure you have some of both. Knowing that this might be a last Thanksgiving or Christmas, we can feel enormous pressure to make this time especially significant. But keeping your level of expectations realistic will make the day go smoother for you, your loved one, extended family and friends.

Now go answer that door and know that with proper preparation, the scariest things awaiting for you this season are only the neighborhood kids in costume looking for candy.

 


 


Gary Barg
Editor-in-Chief

gary@caregiver.com