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FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN  / The Gift Shop Gift

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The Gift Shop Gift

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I believe that I have the unique distinction of being the only person traveling to Ohio this week who is not running for office, working for someone running for office or reporting on the people running for office.  The P.A. system at the Columbus airport sounded like it was announcing the new fall cable television lineup.  “Mr. /Ms. (fill in name of major political reporter), please meet your party at baggage claim.”  Although the elections are extremely interesting for a political junkie, I was in Ohio for something even more interesting, important, educational, and even fun.

I was there for the 119th Fearless Caregiver Conference which was hosted by our partners at the Area Agency on Aging Region 9.  Thanks to AAA CEO Jim Endly, Caregiver Coordinator Laurel Dubeck and their extremely dedicated team for their incredible efforts. The setting was idyllic: a lodge and conference center called Salt Fork in the middle of the woods.  The fun was slightly abated the morning of the event since we woke up to fog you could cut with a knife. Concerned for the safety of caregivers traveling to join us, we were heartened by the fact that everyone showed up – safe and on time.  And I’m glad they did. 

As usual, I really learned a lot from my fellow caregivers during the event; but it was in the gift shop that I heard some of the most novel advice.  I haunt the gift shops when I travel, trying to find interesting refrigerator magnets for my mom.  (No, I don’t get her refrigerator magnets necessarily because I am so cheap; it is what she asks me to bring her – and for that, I am grateful.)

After selecting my gifts for this trip, I ran into a gentleman at the cash register who had attended the morning session and he told me about how he had been stumped by one of his senior clients.  She simply would not allow any of his staff members to clean her house.   Previously, she had exiled his workers to the kitchen, agreeing to let them sit there, but wouldn’t permit them any further into the house. 

My new friend told me that he finally took his client aside and told her he really needs her help. Nobody he hires can clean as well as she can and would she please train his staff on the proper way to take care of a home. Problem solved.  She now accepts any one of his aides into her home and allows them to do their job.

 

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