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FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN  / The Doctoring the Doctor Principle /  Editorial List

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The Doctoring the Doctor Principle

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I will fearlessly learn all I can about my loved one’s healthcare needs and become an integral member of his or her medical care team.

Fearless Caregiver Manifesto

This week’s discussion of Fearless Caregiver Manifesto Principle Five dovetails perfectly with a conversation we had at the Orlando Fearless Caregiver Conference last week. First of all, thanks to our wonderful friends – the Central Florida professional, advocate and family caregivers who joined us for the day. Thanks also to the members of our dedicated and knowledgeable morning Q and A Panel of Experts and our exceptional Central Florida Caregiving Thought Leaders Panel. And congratulations to the Senior Resource Alliance for receiving the 2013 Central Florida Community Fearless Caregiver Award. Look to this space in the near future for pictures and videos of the event.

The conversation in question was about how challenging it is at times to get our loved one’s doctors to consider hospice care when necessary. So let’s review the facts:

What is hospice care?

Hospice is a philosophy of care. It treats the person rather than the disease and focuses on quality of life. It surrounds the patient and family with a team consisting of professionals who not only address physical distress, but emotional and spiritual issues as well. Hospice care is patient-centered because the needs of the patient and family drive the activities of the hospice team.

Where is hospice care provided?

Hospice is a concept of care. Not a place.  In fact, the majority of hospice care in the nation is provided at home, but hospice can be provided in hospitals, stand-alone facilities or even in penal institutions

Why is it sometimes a challenge for doctors to consider hospice care?

I am afraid too many caregivers and even physicians don’t consider hospice soon enough when necessary. And I can tell you firsthand just how important hospice can be—not only for your loved one’s care, but also for your own peace of mind.

 


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