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 Cancer

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Ovarian Cancer: Helping Caregivers
Communicate and Cope
By Sandra Ray, Staff Writer
(Page 3 of 4)  

If caregivers do not manage their own personal feelings and emotions with relation to their already pressure-packed situation, they can set themselves and their loved ones up for even more demanding situations. Burn-out in caregivers is common, unfortunately. It manifests itself in many ways, including:

  • Illness for the caregiver
  • Apathy about their role as caregiver
  • Depression
  • Social withdrawa
  • Irritability or increased anxiety

There are simple activities that can go a long way in improving caregiver attitudes and relieving stressful situations. Some of these include:

  • Setting realistic limits
  • Taking a walk
  • Keeping a journal of feelings and emotions
  • Joining a caregiver support group
  • Talking to friends
  • Going on a mini-shopping spree
  • Eating lunch out with a friend
  • Learning a new hobby or restarting ones you may have put aside.

By paying attention to your needs during these challenging times, you can improve your ability to care for your loved one. In addition, redefining “success” in your given situation can also help to overcome some of the anxiety of the situation. Redefining success means recognizing that reaching smaller goals during the treatment and recovery process can be just as rewarding as overcoming large barriers.

If Death is Unavoidable:

For women facing stage III or IV ovarian cancer, treatment may only delay a woman’s death. Survival statistics for advanced ovarian cancer are low, especially the longer the disease is undetected and the further it has spread throughout the body. If the cancer recurs in other areas of the body, it may also be a sign that the disease has reached terminal stages.

 

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