Caregiver.com

For About and By Caregivers
 


 
Subscribe to our bi-monthly publication Today's Caregiver magazine


  + Larger Font | - Smaller Font
 



CARENOTES / Past Carenotes / Discussion Forum / Let's Talk

Carenotes

Welcome to CareNotes. In this special section we will feature a reader's letter and provide an opportunity for an interactive exchange that will help find some answers and possible solutions to concerns. If you wish to respond to this letter, simple follow the link provided at the end of the letter and add your comments and thoughts to our CareNotes Board.

This Week's Carenote - 12/05/08
I think our daughter may be a Manic-depressive, and we are in the process of figuring it all out.  I have read quite a bit but am confused as I am not sure if  there is a  difference between Bipolar and Manic-depressive.  Is there or is it the same thing?


Reply to Letter  |  View Comments  |   Past Carenotes |   Discussion Forum

View Comments

Name: Alison
Location: North Carolina
Date: 12/05/2008
Time: 05:50 AM

Comments

Manic depression is the old name for bipolar disorder. This is a treatable disease, although people often struggle to get a good diagnosis, on the right medications, and to stay in treatment. the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) is a support group for families and an advocacy group. You can get information and they also have classes for family members to understand better ways to cope with mental illness in the family. The Mental Health Association is also a good source of information and advocacy.


Name:
Location: Delaware
Date: 12/05/2008
Time: 06:07 AM

Comments

They are one and the same, just other names for the condition. She really should be assessed by a mental health specialist; usually a psychiatrist for a diagnosis and medication and talking with a psychologist (or psychiatrist) for "talk therapy."


Name: Paige Coyne
Location: New Jersey
Date: 12/05/2008
Time: 06:23 AM

Comments

Hi - Bipolar Disorder is the same as Manic-Depressive Illness. The name was simply changed over the years. There are two types of the illness: Bipolar I and Bipolar II. Our 18-year-old daughter has Bipolar I disorder with rapid cycling in addition to panic disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, General Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder. She was diagnosed a few months prior to her 15th birthday. You will find a great support system in NAMI - the National Alliance on Mental Illness. NAMI has an excellent program called Family to Family, which is a 12-week program if you have a loved one who has a mental illness. You can find your local chapter on the web. Another helpful organization is the DBSA - the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. I hope I was of some help. Keep reading. Knowledge is the best!!! Take Care.


Name: dlevy@caregivered.org
Location: David Levy
Date: 12/05/2008
Time: 11:14 AM

Comments

MedlinePLus is an excellent government website for this kind of information. I have cut and pasted what they had to say. There is no difference clinical difference between Bipolar disorder and manic depression - see highlight below.

Bipolar disorder is characterized by periods of excitability (mania) alternating with periods of depression. The "mood swings" between mania and depression can be very abrupt. Bipolar disorder affects men and women equally and usually appears between the ages of 15 and 25. The exact cause is unknown, but it occurs more often in relatives of people with bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder results from disturbances in the areas of the brain that regulate mood. During manic periods, a person with bipolar disorder may be overly impulsive and energetic, with an exaggerated sense of self. The depressed phase brings overwhelming feelings of anxiety, low self-worth, and suicidal thoughts. There are two primary types of bipolar disorder. People with bipolar disorder - have had at least one fully manic episode with periods of major depression. In the past, bipolar disorder - was called manic depression. People with bipolar disorder II seldom experience full-fledged mania. Instead they experience periods of hypomania (elevated levels of energy and impulsiveness that are not as extreme as the symptoms of mania). These hypomanic periods alternate with episodes of major depression. A mild form of bipolar disorder called cyclothymia involves periods of hypomania and mild depression, with less-severe mood swings. People with bipolar disorder II or cyclothymia may be misdiagnosed as having depression alone.


Name: Jim
Location: Maryland
Date: 12/05/2008
Time: 07:53 PM

Comments

As I understand it they are the same. The internet has plenty of information. Check her Thyroid levels. Good luck.


Name: b
Location: GA
Date: 12/05/2008
Time: 07:53 PM

Comments

My husband is bipolar. Bipolar and Manic-depressive is the same. Manic-depressive was the term used several years ago. Bipolar is the term most likely to be used now. There are groups that can provide you with information about this illness. Do a search on the internet. There are many good books that will also give you information. It is stressful yet manageable as long as the patient will take the medications regularly and visit their doctor on a regular basis. It is very important for the family to work together. Members of a family may notice the symptoms of a manic stage or a depression stage before the patient realizes that it is happening. Family members need a close working relationship with the doctor so that they can deal with these symptoms as soon as they see them. Good luck.


 


 







 

Join our Group or become
 a
Fan below

Caregiver on Facebook

   Follow us on Twitter

You TubeFearless Caregiver Channel