If you can't see this email correctly, please click here  |  Mobile Version

Caregiver News
January 16, 2014  |  Issue #680  
  Caregiver.com Today's Caregiver magazine Fearless Caregiver Conference Recommend Us  
From the Editor's Pen Gary Barg • Editor-in-Chief • gary@caregiver.com

Gary Barg
The DNA of Character

Maybe it took decades (okay, many, many decades) for the picture to become clear. But, as I know that so much of my make-up can be attributed to DNA—Gramp’s hairline (for that I am thankful), Dad’s height (nothing personal, Mom, but thankful once again)—I am also drawn to consider the DNA of Character.

Of course, I see traits of my family in my own personality—Mom’s humor (check), her sense of style (no trace of that in me), Gramp’s love of mischief (check), Dad’s calmness and ability to reason (well, sometimes). But, as I think back to my childhood, I can also see parts of me actually attributable to my extended family of neighbors  ...more


Share facebook twitter YouTube Pinterest


Advocacy - A Weapon in the
Fight Against Prostate Cancer
By Liza Berger

Jan Manarite’s husband, Dominic, has been living with prostate cancer for more than nine years. And that is in large part due to her advocacy efforts, she does not hesitate to admit  ...more

Caregiver New Year Special


Physical Exercise:
Good Medicine for the Brain
By Leilani Doty, PhD

Regular physical exercise is important for brain health. Being active is important whether a person has normal memory and thinking abilities or has a memory disorder such as a Mild Cognitive Impairment, early/moderate Alzheimer’s disease or related progressive memory disorders  ...more

Tips and Techniques for Dealing with Stress
By Dr. Rita Nachen Gugel

Change is an expected part of our daily lives today. Dealing with it so that YOU control IT rather than vice versa is an important and positive force in controlling your life. Try a few of these tips.

  1. Accept what you cannot change. Take a tip from AA. Change what you can, if it bothers you. But, if you cannot change it, learn to live with it.

  2. Face up to your problems. Sort them out, and see which ones are real and which are simply imagined. Deal with them as they are, and not what you think they are  ...more

Sharing Wisdom

From Chris:  Response to Managing Meds
I enjoyed the article on Managing Medications. As a caregiver, it can be very difficult. I decided to list all the meds on a colored index card and lay the corresponding pill next to its name. I had the list separated for morning and bedtime medications. Then I took a picture of it and printed it. The photo made it easier for me to keep track of them, easier for the doctors’ offices, and would have been a big help if anything happened to me! I carried a copy with me. Be sure to include the patient's name and the date on the card.
Thanks!

[Chris is a caregiver for husband Hugh who is living with frontal temporal dementia.]

From Debbie in San Diego:  If you have a computer, look on YouTube for some videos on double amputee transfer. Much depends on their ability to help you. If they have upper body strength, a trapeze over the bed can help. But for you alone, it's really hard. Make your surfaces smooth and close together to slide the person from place to place. But it is so much easier with two people, holding hands like a cradle and scooping them up.

 

The best ideas and solutions for taking care of your loved one often come from other caregivers. Please post your ideas and insights and we will share them with your fellow caregivers.  

Today's Caregiver magazine Let's Talk Caregiver Book Club Caregiver Store

Caregiver.com Support Group Directory Find Caregiver Support Groups in your area.
Have an idea for an article? Contact us at editor@caregiver.com
Recommend Us! Tell your friends about Caregiver.com
Subscribe today! If you received caregiver newsletter and are not yet a subscriber,
and would like to begin receiving a complimentary copy of your own.
Caregiver.com’s Privacy Policy Statement

Copyright© 1995-2014 Caregiver.com Inc.,
All rights reserved by Caregiver.com and its subsidiaries.