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The Lainie Kazan Interview (Page 1 of 2)

An Interview with Lainie Kazan

Gary Barg:  You know, as a person who flies a lot, I’ve heard about DVT over the years; but now it seems that DVT affects a lot more people than commonly thought and affects more people than just long-distance travelers.

Lanie Kazan:  DVT affects roughly 3 million people each year, and 300 thousand die annually from a DVT complication called pulmonary embolism. That’s more than breast cancer and AIDs combined.

GB:  What is DVT and what are some of the risk factors for it?

LK:  DVT stands for deep vein thrombosis, and the risk factors for a DVT blood clot include restricted mobility because of hospitalization or due to acute illness or certain surgeries such as hip replacement or knee replacement surgery. If you’ve had a prior DVT like me, or age and obesity come into play, these can also be factors. If you’ve had chemotherapy, heart surgery, respiratory diseases or if you smoke or use birth control pills, or even being pregnant can be triggers for DVT.

GB:  I didn’t know that. When were you diagnosed with DVT?

LK:  I was diagnosed in 1973 or 1975. I had a pretty minor fracture of my foot and ripped a lot of cartilage and ligaments, so there was a lot of blood, which coagulated in my calf and moved up to my lungs; which is what happens when you have a PE (pulmonary embolism). I was on my way to do a concert tour of Australia and the next thing I knew, I was feeling like I was getting the flu. So here I had this cast on my leg and had flu-like symptoms. I called my doctor and explained that I’d broken my foot, but was feeling flu-like symptoms, and he asked that I come to his office immediately. I was put into the hospital and I had a pulmonary embolism in both lungs.

GB:  What were your treatments like? 

 

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