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 An Interview with Julie Newmar (Page 2 of 3)

Gary Barg: I have been on your Web site, julienewmarwrites.com. And I have to say with some envy, you are a terrific writer.

Julie Newmar: That is what I do now. This is my sixth career.

Gary Barg: I thought there was just so much honesty in your writing. I have been really intrigued to read about your diagnosis with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and your use of the braces. How are you doing with the braces?

Julie Newmar: I just started. I am in the big adjustment period. I am beginning to get these new legs.

Gary Barg: When were you diagnosed?

Julie Newmar: It was in such an offhand way; over the telephone. To tell you the truth, I do not even remember when it was. It did not mean anything to me. I had this long period of denial, or not being there was more my case; like, oh no, no, I can walk over there. And then I found that I was brain walking instead of putting one foot after another. My brain was telling my body how to walk and, through the grace of a lot of charming people, I did and did not know. I still do that; you know, ask people: Will you help me cross the street? Would you do this?

Gary Barg: Oh, they must be thrilled to do that.

Julie Newmar: [Laughs] Well, I get away with it; and then at some point, you have to take the plunge and see what there is out there to help you.

Gary Barg: I read a lot about intention in your writings. What role do you think intention plays in your role as a caregiver?

Julie Newmar: It is overriding. Intension is where you are going to drive your car and the trips that you want to make as joyous as possible. I have never experienced anything but joy with my child. I do not even see anyone that might have a frown on their face when they are looking at him. Of course, you know, I have been in show business. I have stood on a stage. I do not look out into the audience to see what they are thinking of me while I am performing, whatever it is I am performing; because if I did, it would disrupt the quality of what I am doing.

Gary Barg: What are you up to these days; what is going on?

Julie Newmar: Well, I am working on three books. I am in my sixth career, which is writing, because a year ago I thought if I cannot move, if I do not have my million dollar dancing legs, which for me that is who I am, I am losing the best thing I have. I mean, wham-bam, what do you do about that? And then I realized that I loved words and I like to write and I have this big window which looks out on this beautiful garden. I am a right-brained person and so computers are not my natural friend, but I found someone who comes in every week and teaches me the computer so that I can write. I can reach people, reach outwards to the  world; and that so excited me to realize you could reach people like yourself and talk to those with whom you have a real rapport, a real excitement, a real beneficial experience. So, I started doing this and now I see happily how it is paying off. But even if I did not walk, I could do what I am doing now with enormous pleasure.

 

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