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Leaving Your Loved One Home Alone

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If it has not already been debated, the possibility of leaving your loved one alone in your home is certainly bound to occur. You will no doubt have many questions to ponder as you decide upon the prospects of leaving them such as, will they attempt to go outside?, will they hurt themselves?, or will they need emergency assistance? This difficult question involves you the caregiver, and your loved one, who was once an independent person. The both of you will usually disagree with the situation, as it is normal for caregivers to feel their loved one cannot be alone, while they believe they are fine and healthy enough to be alone for how ever long. Asking other family members, health care professionals, and other caregivers for advice will go a long way to determining the likelihood of their safety being jeopardized when left alone. Some other important questions to consider before leaving them alone for the first time, or if you are questioning whether they are able to stay alone any longer include:

  • Are they capable of calling 911 or neighbors if an emergency occurs?

  • Can they distinguish friends and family from strangers if they are faced with answering the door or having someone enter the home?

  • If they are hungry, can they prepare and eat a meal without your assistance?

  • Is it easy for them to use the bathroom without your help, or do they require aid every time. Are there any other plans in place if they are not able to go to the bathroom without your help?

  • How does their behavior and temperament change from when you leave to when you return? Do they appear angered or scared at the first sign of you leaving the house?

  • In case of emergency are they able to leave the home and seek shelter outside?

  • Are they aware of smoke alarms and unusual noises, which may trigger danger, or are they likely to overlook all such noises?

  • Do they suffer from Alzheimer’s or dementia, and if so are they likely to wander off and get lost easily?

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