Caregiver.com

For About and By Caregivers


Subscribe to our bi-monthly publication Today's Caregiver magazine

  + Larger Font | - Smaller Font



ARTICLES / Caregiver / Caregivers Challenge: Finding Daycare Options /

Share This Article

Caregivers Challenge:
Finding Daycare Options

By Cheryl Ellis, Staff Writer

(Page 2 of 2)

Some facilities may be difficult to get into, and switching from one to another isn’t an easy solution. Inquire about temporary admission, which will free up space in the program for long-term care needs, and allow you to test how that particular center meets everyone’s needs. If you are able to set up more than one of these situations, it can stave off the anxiety of finding a permanent program, or passing the time of being on a waiting list for your first choice.

WHAT IS DAY CARE, REALLY?
Day care is a managed program that is designed for specific individuals who cannot stay at home by themselves. Frail elderly persons, individuals with memory loss, or seniors with other challenges are candidates for day care.

Facilities are managed by state or local programs, including non-profit organizations. Private day care may be a franchise, or run by an individual who rents or owns a facility.

Clients are overseen during the hours they attend. Hours will vary, but generally span regular business hours (9 a.m to 5 p.m) to accommodate caregivers who work outside the home.

Meals, snacks and activities are part of the day care experience. There may be trips to shopping centers (with caregiver permission), restaurants or other off site expeditions. Each facility offers a calendar of activities to orient loved one and family to the day care structure. Most programs include arts and crafts, music, time for rest and visiting with other clients.

Reputable day care programs focus on “caring.” Clients are offered a place to enjoy the day with an emphasis on retaining self esteem. Day care is not a “dumping ground”! Although loved ones (especially those with dementia) may resist attending, staff members are skilled in making clients feel comfortable. Loved ones will share stories about their day, perhaps bringing home crafts made in “class.” Activities will span the range of clients’ abilities.

Day care is an enhancement to the journey of caregiver and loved one. Family members can enjoy a sense of security that their loved one is attended to. Loved ones can develop a life outside the home that is interesting, fun and safe. They do not have to worry, and if they show concern or anxiety, staff will reassure them as needed.

As an arrangement to delay or eliminate placement in a long term care facility, day care is a preferred option by lay and professional caregivers. The combination of activities, change of atmosphere and competent personnel can deliver quality care. For some individuals, day care offers a unique type of “therapy” that doesn’t require a doctor’s order.

MORE BENEFITS
Caregivers will have an improved relationship with their loved one. Stress reduction may be the apparent bonus, but the joy of seeing a loved one interact with others can improve everyone’s overall outlook. Even the “normal” aging process has its progressive side, but day care can become a restorative force in a loved one’s journey.

Programs may offer caregivers options for counseling and support, and information about other possibilities such as at home respite care.

Connecting with other caregivers serves as a reminder that many individuals have chosen the path to work with their loved one by delivering “hands on” care. Relationships outside of day care may be formed over time, creating new friends and resources.

Feeling alone is an unwelcome side effect for caregiver and loved one. Day care reaches out to both individuals, creating a solid atmosphere of support. The miracle of connection with others can be explored in a professional environment that yields many personal benefits.

  1 2


Printable Version Printable Version

 

 

Related Articles

ADC2

Respite For Two

Coping with Alzheimer's - Tribute to a Caretaker